How to get a business credit card

Getting a business credit card is one of the most powerful steps you can take toward keeping your business organized.

It’s a great way to keep your business expenses separate from your personal ones. But beyond that, using a business credit card can help you build a strong credit profile for your business. Credit bureaus track business credit cards and loans when tabulating a credit score for a business.

If you develop a track record of paying your business credit card bills on time and don’t max out your card, it will help you continue to build business credit. So how do you apply for a business credit card? Here are the steps to take.

1. Check your personal credit score

Generally, you will need to personally guarantee a business credit card, and credit card companies will evaluate your loan application based in part on your personal credit history.

If your credit card score needs buffing up, spend three to six months working on lowering your credit utilization — the percentage of your available credit you use — and making sure you pay your bills like clockwork. It’ll make it easier to get a business credit card.

2. Decide which kind of business card fits your needs

If you need a little time to build profits, a business credit card can help by allowing you to carry a balance within a preset credit limit from month to month, as long as you make a minimum monthly payment. This can be helpful if cash flow is tight — especially if you can get a deal offering 0% interest for several months.

A dedicated credit card for your business can help you build business credit – but only if the issuer reports to business credit-reporting agencies. Not all do. Before you apply for a card, ask and make sure the issuer reports your progress where it counts.

check your company’s credit? There are three bureaus that track business credit: Dun & Bradstreet, Experian and Equifax. Each has a free search tool you can use to check whether they are actually tracking your business.

It’s important to analyze your business’ needs and expenses before choosing a credit card for it. If you’re trying to save money, a simple flat-rate cash back credit card with no annual fee, such as the Ink Business Unlimited® Credit Card, may be just what you need.

But a business credit card with a hefty annual fee may prove worth it for your business. For example, if your business requires a lot of travel, a card such as The Business Platinum Card® from American Express will give you (and possibly your employees) rewards and perks you can use for business travel.

3. Gather the business information you’ll need for your application

Review the application before you start entering information so you have all of the documents you need in one place. An application for a business credit card will typically ask you to enter your:

  • Legal name of business (such as Acme LLC)
  • Business name on card
  • Business mailing address and phone number
  • Type of business (general industry, category)
  • Tax identification number (otherwise known as EIN)
  • Annual business revenue
  • Number of employees
  • Years in business

If you don’t have an EIN, you can apply for an EIN for free through the IRS.

4. Gather the personal information you may need

Issuers of business credit cards require you to provide personal income and sometimes monthly expenses. Most ask for the same info they request when you apply for a personal card, in addition to your business information.

For example, under “personal information,” applications for Chase Ink business cards ask for your “title as authorizing officer,” home address, date of birth, primary phone number and email address, and total gross annual income.

5. Submit your application

Many credit card companies allow you to submit your application online, and you can apply for many cards through CreditCards.com. Apply for only one card at a time and see how you fare.

What to do if you get rejected for a business credit card

If you get rejected because you have not built sufficient credit, all is not lost.

If have no credit or bad credit, you may need a secured business card at first. A secured business credit card often requires you to put down a deposit for the privilege of using the card. While this setup isn’t ideal if you are short of cash, if you can come up with the deposit, it will give you a chance to prove you can use credit responsibly.

If you build up a steady track record of paying your card on time and ideally more than the minimum balance, you should be able to graduate to better credit card deals in the near future.

Source: creditcards.com

17 Tips for Getting a Job Out of College

As if adulting wasn’t enough, juggling final exams, project deadlines, and a social life, along with worrying about getting a job out of college, can make the last few months of your senior year feel overwhelming. The good news is you’re not alone.

Many graduates feel like they can’t find a job after college. In fact, 66 percent of them are not very optimistic that they’ll get a job that will fit their career goals. Although searching for jobs after graduation can be stressful, learning how you can prepare for the job market can lift some weight off your shoulders.

If you want to learn how to navigate the job search and dodge common mistakes recent grads make, this guide will help you better prepare for the future. You can also check out the Game of Life After College in our infographic below.

The Current Landscape for Getting a Job After College

Is it hard to get a job after college? There’s not a concrete answer to this, since each person has their own set of skills and experience. However, here are some stats to keep in mind and other pressing questions answered, including what percentage of college students get a job after they graduate and what is the average time to get a job after graduation.

  • In 2020, the percentage of employed college graduates went down from 76% to 67%.
  • In August 2021, employment rose by 235,000 in one month.
  • The unemployment rate went from 14.7% in April 2020 to 5.2 percent in August 2021.
  • In October 2020, 67.3% of college graduates were employed after they graduated.
  • It takes an average of three to six months for college graduates to find a job after college.
  • In March 2021, the unemployment rate for bachelor’s degree holders was 3.7% compared to 6.7% for those only holding a high school diploma.

Reasons People Struggle With Getting a Job Out of College

Finding a job after college can be challenging, especially when learning how to adapt to life after graduating. If you are in the position where you can’t find a job after college, the following reasons might help explain:

Not Being Prepared

Some college graduates will only start preparing for their career after graduation. Although preparation involves some effort, such as taking online courses, finding an internship, or networking, being prepared for the job market is crucial to getting a job after college.

Not Being Proactive

Not being proactive by following up with potential employers and reaching out to your network is also a common reason college graduates might take longer to land a job. Only applying on job boards is a common mistake job seekers make, as they tend to get lost in the pool of applicants.

Not Enough Experience

Having a degree in hand doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll get a job right after graduation. Most employers consider having internship and work experience one of the top factors for considering a candidate.

Not Making It About the Employer

Another common mistake recent graduates make is focusing on what they want out of a job and not the employer’s needs. Employers want to know what you can provide them with and how your skills align with the position.

Not Doing Enough Research

If you don’t know what you’re looking for, you likely won’t be able to find it. Not doing enough research is another struggle graduates face when starting the job search. Researching what’s suitable for you and what career paths to take can help you achieve your career goals faster.

 

how to stay motivated in the job search

How To Get a Job Right Out of College

Now, with all these stressors against you, you might be wondering, “How do I get a job just out of college?” Even if this won’t be your first job ever, making the most of your college experience and job search process can put you at ease.

1. Get Experience During College

While in college, you’ll have many opportunities to join clubs and organizations, attend events and seminars, and learn new skills. Each of these can help you learn more about yourself and enhance what you have to offer — plus, it looks great on your resume.

Pro tip: If you didn’t have a job during college, use your participation in a club or organization as your job experience.

2. Start Networking

When you’re ready to start your career, you’ll likely hear that networking is very important, and that’s because at least 70 percent of open positions are not advertised. Meeting people within your major and professional organizations can be a great way to start building connections. But don’t limit yourself — even friends, family, and coworkers can be part of your network.

Pro tip: If you haven’t heard back from a job you applied for, ask for help from your network or college alumni who work for that company.

3. Research the Job Market

Just like a research project for a class in college, exploring different job fields can help you narrow down your job search. Learning about what kinds of jobs are in that field, what a typical day looks like, how the job market is, and what requirements are needed can help you understand exactly what to look for and increase your chances of getting hired.

Pro tip: When doing your research, take note of common skills and experience required in the job descriptions, and personalize your resume accordingly.

4. Be Proactive

If you want to find a job right after you graduate, being proactive is the key. Don’t just wait around — apply to different jobs, reach out to people in your network and on LinkedIn, and follow up on any jobs you haven’t heard back from. By showing interest and being proactive, you’ll let hiring managers know that you’re ready to put your skills and experience to work.

Pro tip: After applying for a job, send the hiring manager a personal email letting them know you applied and why you believe you’re a good fit for the job.

5. Become a Volunteer

Seeking volunteer opportunities can be a great way to give back to the community while also building your skills and connections. Finding a volunteering activity that you enjoy can also help boost your communication and interpersonal skills, and could potentially lead you to find your future employer.

Pro tip: Join a volunteering club or organization on campus to help the local community.

6. Attend Career Fairs

Career fairs might sound intimidating, but there’s a good chance your future employer is there. Recruiters at career fairs are ready to meet people and want to learn more about you and your experience. This is a great way to develop your interviewing skills as well as learn more about different companies and job opportunities.

Pro tip: Research companies on the career fair list ahead of time, so you can come prepared with specific questions to ask the recruiters.

7. Create a Portfolio Website

Take an extra step and create a personal website to showcase your skills and experience. Even if it’s just a simple website, this is a great opportunity to share your writing, photography, or art, or just to tell your story.

Pro tip: Add your website to your resume and job applications as well as your LinkedIn profile to make you stand out to employers.

8. Land an Internship

Finding an internship can be a great way to test the waters and see what a potential job in that field might look like. As a matter of fact, 55 percent of employers believe having internship experience is one of the top factors for considering candidates. Getting an internship can also help you build connections and could even lead to a full-time position.

Pro tip: Taking an internship position after graduating college can help you sharpen your skills if you didn’t get enough experience during school.

9. Consider a Part-Time Job

Even if it’s not in your field, pursuing a part-time job can also help you build connections and skills. Getting a part-time job on campus can not only allow you to earn some extra bucks to pay your tuition, but it can also help you understand your work style and what kinds of tasks you enjoy doing. Finding a part-time position in your field can also get you a foot in the door, and potentially lead to a full-time position.

Pro tip: Working part-time after college can help you build your work ethic and bring in extra money while applying for full-time positions.

10. Keep Your LinkedIn Updated

A lot of recruiters will take a look at your LinkedIn profile during the hiring process — in fact, 72 percent of them use it for recruiting. Keeping your LinkedIn profile updated with your most recent resume and experience can help show recruiters that you’re open to work.

Pro tip: You can also add an #OpenToWork frame to your profile picture on LinkedIn to let recruiters know you are actively looking.

11. Leverage Career Services

On-campus career centers are one of the best sources for new job opportunities, especially locally. Many employers will leave their information with university career centers, which means they’re open to hiring graduates from there. On top of giving you career guidance, career centers may also offer resume and networking workshops, mentoring programs, and mock interviews.

Pro tip: You can still visit your campus career center after graduating to get tips and strategies on how you can improve your resume and interview skills.

12. Take Online Courses

If you want to level up your skills aside from what you learn in class, taking online courses can help you get hands-on experience in the field. It can also guide you to figure out if it’s the right career path for you.

Pro tip: There are a variety of open online courses you can take for free on websites such as Coursera, Udemy, and edX.

13. Find a Mentor

There are many benefits of having a mentor, like providing career guidance and constructive criticism. A mentor is someone you trust and look up to, and can be a supervisor, coworker, teacher, or even a friend. Building a relationship with your mentor can also help you strengthen your communication skills and avoid common pitfalls.

Pro tip: If you don’t have someone close to you to become your mentor, many college career centers have mentorship programs that link you to alumni.

14. Create a Routine

The job hunt can seem endless at times, but building a routine can help you keep track of your goals. Schedule times on your calendar for each task, such as searching for jobs, updating your resume and profile, following up with recruiters, taking online courses, and networking. But don’t forget about your health! Schedule mental health breaks, such as working out, taking a walk, watching a movie, or reaching out to a loved one.

Pro tip: Try using time management techniques such as the Pomodoro Technique and time blocking to help you stay on track.

15. Join Professional Development Groups

Job board websites can feel overwhelming when there are so many job postings. Narrow down your search by finding groups for a specific field or location. These groups can also be a great place to connect with other job seekers who can share career insights.

Pro tip: Facebook and LinkedIn are great places to find groups, such as remote job seekers and city-specific jobs.

16. Level Up Your Resume

Since some job postings tend to get hundreds of applicants, many job seekers are finding ways to stand out from the crowd. One way to do this is by spicing up your resume and making it creative. You can do that by trying different resume layouts, colors, and even adding a fun facts section. Although some would go as far as sending a donut box resume, be mindful of the company you are applying for.

Pro tip: You can create your resume using a template from websites such as Canva. Make sure it’s saved as a PDF so resume-scanning softwares can still read it.

17. Apply on Company Websites

Another way to stand out from the crowd and not get lost in the sea of job applicants is to apply directly on the company’s website instead of only big job boards. Some companies will keep their websites updated with current job openings and actively check for candidates. Applying through their website can make it more personal and show that you’re especially interested in working for them.

Pro tip: If you find a place where you genuinely want to work, it may be worth emailing them even if they don’t have current openings to show you are interested.

Why Your First Job Out of College Matters

Your first job out of college might not be a perfect fit, but it’s still one of the most important. If you happen to be in a position where you realize the job is not what you expected, use it as a learning opportunity.

This is your chance to develop your skills and learn from your mistakes. So dive into your first job like a pro and learn negotiation skills, tackle your time management abilities, connect with others in the industry, and discover your preferred work style. Taking advantage of a not-so-great first job can set you up for career success down the road.

 

If getting a job out of college is one of your main goals, preparing ahead of time can not only help you stay motivated while job searching, but can also help you land a job faster. By learning what common mistakes you’re struggling with and following the tips in this guide, you can get one step closer to achieving career success. Monster | Psychology Today

The post 17 Tips for Getting a Job Out of College appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

17 Negotiation Tactics and Tips To Help You Score the Best Deals

Negotiation is a powerful skill that helps you advocate for yourself when it comes to your career and finances. However, the thought of negotiating your salary or even your cable bill may bring up feelings of anxiety and apprehension. It’s important to overcome these negative feelings so that you can speak up for your best financial interests. Level up your skills and your confidence by learning about these 17 negotiation tactics. With these tips and tricks in your back pocket, you’ll be equipped to negotiate the best deals for you and your budget.

Feel free to jump to the infographic for quick takeaways on effective negotiation tips to use now.

1. Try the Foot-In-The-Door Technique

The foot-in-the-door technique is a tactic that uses a small, initial request to increase the chances of someone agreeing to a second, larger request. This technique can be used when your goal is to achieve similar outcomes. For example, if you want to buy a shirt that is $10, you might haggle with the vendor to get it down to $5. You could then follow up by asking if you can buy two shirts for $10. Not wanting to feel contradictory about giving you the initial discount, they’re likely to allow the second one as well. In this scenario, you’ve successfully negotiated two shirts for the price of one.

2. Get Your Way With the Door-In-The-Face Tactic

Instead of getting your foot in the door, you can also try the door-in-the-face technique. This technique is the opposite of foot-in-the-door because the initial request you make is an unreasonable one that you expect to get turned down. After your first unreasonable request is denied, if you follow up with a smaller, more reasonable request, the person will feel compelled to agree. Door-in-the-face is an effective technique when you want to increase the likelihood of someone agreeing to a small request, like asking to borrow $20 after initially asking for $100.

 

foot-in-the-door-face-negotiation

 

3. Use the “Take It or Leave It” Method

This method is a hard bargaining tactic that suggests an offer is nonnegotiable. One scenario where this method can work is when you have a good or service that someone else needs. If you’re selling your car and a potential buyer counters your selling price, you may respond by saying that’s the price and they can take it or leave it. If the buyer really needs the car, they will take it at your price, and if they can’t meet that price, they’ll be forced to walk away. Since this tactic is structured as an ultimatum, you should be prepared for either outcome.

4. Leverage the Competition

When it comes to negotiating, remember that competition is a great catalyst for better deals. If you’re contemplating a purchase, do your due diligence and compare prices across competitors to find what’s reasonable for your budget. Prices aren’t always the only factor when it comes to a good deal though, and you may find that a preferred store or service charges more. Leverage your knowledge about competing vendors and ask whether they would be willing to match a competitor’s price for the same product or service.

5. Do Your Research

Before walking into any type of negotiation, it’s always helpful to do your research. If you’re looking to negotiate a raise or salary, research the average market value of your position in your area. Go into your negotiation with that number and provide it as evidence for the salary you want. This same premise also applies to buying a house or car. Educate yourself on the going rates for similar homes and cars in your area and use it as a bargaining chip during your negotiations.

6. Find a Win-Win Situation

Another negotiation tactic is to come up with a win-win situation for both parties. Imagine you’re on vacation, and you want to do an activity that fits in your budget. You may decide that you’re interested in an activity that typically costs $100 for two hours. If you have a budget of $50 to spend, you might ask if you can pay $50 for half the normal amount of time spent doing the activity. This offer presents a scenario where you get what you want and stay in your budget, and the other party is still compensated at their normal rate.

 

find-win-scenario-offer-bogey

 

7. Offer a Bogey

Use human nature to your advantage by offering a bogey in a negotiation. A bogey is an issue that you pretend is important to you, but really isn’t. You end up conceding this issue so the other party feels like they should do the same for you. This tactic operates off the psychology of reciprocity. Reciprocity is a social norm that humans abide by and occurs when one person does something for another, so the other person feels compelled to return the favor.

8. Make It Personal

If you’re negotiating outside of a business deal or career decision, it may be helpful to try an emotional appeal during a negotiation. For example, when making an offer on a house, a personal letter to the sellers may help swing a negotiation in your favor. Telling your story builds trust and a personal connection, and these can be very powerful tools of persuasion.

9. Know Your Worth

Whether you’re a loyal customer or hard-working employee, it’s imperative to know your worth in a negotiation. Employees bring value through their work performance, skills, experience, leadership, and education. Customers provide economic value as a consistent revenue stream and social value through their opinion and word of mouth. Depending on which role you’re in, highlight the value that you offer and use it as evidence for better pay or better rates.

10. Prepare for Counters

When two parties try to come to a mutual agreement, it’s natural for either side to push back if something doesn’t work in their favor. Be ready for counteroffers by thinking through what the other side might say ahead of time. Forecast different scenarios and prepare a strategy tailored to each one. Here are a few potential scenarios that may play out when asking for a raise:

If they’re willing to compromise:

  • Take stock of your priorities and figure out if you can negotiate for them.
  • Example: If they can give you a 2 percent raise instead of a 4 percent raise, ask about an additional performance bonus or for more vacation days.

If they say no:

  • Think about ways to steer the negotiation toward a compromise.
  • Ask to revisit the discussion in the future considering your strong work performance.

 

craft-a-good-argument

 

11. Use a Positive Frame

Negotiations don’t always have to be a “take it or leave it” situation. Try finding a positive way to frame your request or demand. If you offer freelance services and someone is trying to negotiate your rates, stay firm in your price with a positive spin. Let the person know that your prices ensure that you can offer them the best quality product or service. Many people would find it difficult to argue with better quality.

12. Exercise Patience

Bargaining for better pay or better prices isn’t easy. If you’re met with resistance, you may feel like giving in so that you don’t have to experience discomfort, anxiety, or fear anymore. If you do feel this, remember to exercise patience. You should be proud of the progress you’ve made negotiating so far and tell yourself that you will see it through. Negotiations take time, but if you can be patient and stand firm in your goals, you might end up better off than when you started.

13. Be Polite

Not all negotiations are the intense, cutthroat experiences that get dramatized in the media. Oftentimes, both parties are just doing the best they can to reach their respective goals. Go into a negotiation with the aim of being firm but friendly. Others will be more receptive to working with you toward your goals if you’re polite and not pushy.

14. Practice What To Say

If you’re nervous about what to say in a negotiation, try practicing beforehand. Ask someone you trust to read or listen to your prepared negotiation and give an outside perspective on what works and what can be improved. Then when you actually need to negotiate, you can be confident in your practice and know that you’re prepared to negotiate to the best of your abilities.

 

communicate-credibility

 

15. Boost Your Confidence

Sometimes it’s hard to feel confident when you’re anticipating an uncomfortable or awkward discussion, but confidence can help you appear more credible and make people more receptive to you. To boost your confidence, try repeating a mantra to yourself, striking a power pose, or playing your favorite pump-up song to help relieve any jitters.

16. Ask Questions

In a negotiation, never underestimate the importance of asking questions. This helps you buy time to think but also gives you more information to inform your strategy. Try lines of questioning that get at why or how certain decisions were made. Another option is to simply ask for help. Some examples are listed below:

  • “I’m trying to understand why my medical bill is so high. Would I be able to see an itemized receipt?”
  • “I didn’t receive enough financial aid to attend this school. Can you please help me write an appeal for more aid?”

17. Stall When Necessary

In certain situations, time can put unnecessary pressure on you. If you need to take a step back to contemplate your options or make the right decision, don’t be afraid to ask for time to think. In the case of a job offer, you can politely request a deadline for a decision or let them know that you need a few days to think. Remember that you’ve already done well by attempting to negotiate, so don’t throw away your hard work with a rushed decision.

Negotiation Examples

Now that you have the skills to negotiate, put them to work and do what’s best for you and your finances in these surprisingly negotiable scenarios. For each situation, find a couple effective ways to get the conversation started and remember to remain confident and polite in your communication.

 

surprising-things-you-can-negotiate

 

Negotiating Salary

Research found that 70 percent of managers expect to negotiate salary and benefits when making an offer to a candidate, yet only 46 percent of men and 34 percent of women ever bring it up. Many job offers are flexible when it comes to compensation, so don’t leave money on the table by not opening negotiations. It may feel daunting or uncomfortable to discuss money, but know that companies expect you to do it. It’s important to take the chance and give yourself the best opportunity to maximize your income.

Best negotiation tactics and what to say:

  • Do your research and know your worth:
    “Thank you for the offer. I’m excited about this position and the opportunity to collaborate with your team. I understand the position is budgeted for [insert amount], but I’m hoping to explore if a [insert desired amount] salary is possible. This was listed as the industry average for this position in this area, and based on my skill set and experience, I’m confident that I can provide this level of value to the company.”
  • Prepare for counters:
    “I appreciate you taking the time to discuss this starting salary, and I completely understand any budget limitations. I’m still interested in joining your team, but I’d love to explore the possibility of a sign-on bonus considering my expertise and skill set.”

Lower Your Bills

When it comes to cable and internet bills, not everyone knows that those rates aren’t set in stone. It’s worthwhile to negotiate your monthly cable and internet bill because it means extra change in your pocket every month. Take what you save on WiFi or cable and contribute it to your savings or use it to pay off your credit card every month. For inspiration on how to get your savings, check out our recommended strategies below.

Best negotiation tactics and what to say:

  • Leverage the competition:
    “I’ve noticed that [insert competitor company] charges $50 per month for internet with a speed of 100 Mbps. With your company, I’m currently paying $60 for the same internet speed. I’d love to keep my business with your company, and I’m wondering if you can match that price for me.”
  • Ask questions:
    “I noticed that my cable bill recently increased, and I was wondering if there is anything you can do to lower it.” Then politely follow up with: “Is that the best you’re able to do?” or “Are there any other promotions for my current services?”

Appeal Your Financial Aid

For those that applied for financial aid to fund college, sometimes the actual aid you’re awarded is too little or nothing at all. Know that there are steps you can take to petition this decision. Contact the financial aid office of your college or university and ask them about their appeal process. In most cases, you’ll need to put together an appeal packet that includes a letter presenting your reasons for the appeal. Below are some persuasive tactics to use in your letter.

Best negotiation tactics and what to say:

  • Ask questions:
    “Hello, I’m calling to see if there is a way to appeal my financial aid decision. Is it possible to petition for new financial circumstances to be taken into account?”
  • Make it personal:
    “I’ve committed to this university to study biology in the fall, but unfortunately, I’m not able to go because I wasn’t awarded any financial aid. I’m writing this appeal to see if my financial aid application can be reviewed again based on additional financial circumstances. I’m very grateful for any help in making my dream of becoming a doctor a reality.”

Decrease Your Rent

Rent is set by landlords and is based on a variety of factors such as the current market price for rent, the supply and demand for housing, or the market value of the property. Each of these factors fluctuate based on your area and the property, and rent prices can actually be negotiated because of this. Try decreasing your rent with these tactics:

Best negotiation tactics and what to say:

  • Leverage the competition:
    “After looking at several similar properties, I’d like to discuss a decrease in rent based on a few lower offerings I received.”
  • Find a win-win situation:
    “Based on your listing, you’d ideally prefer a tenant committed to a two-year lease. I’m a good tenant who would love to commit to your property for two more years, but I’d like to do so at my current rent of $1,100 instead of the increased price of $1,250.”

Reduce Medical Bills

A recent study found that 60 percent of Americans have experienced the harsh reality of medical debt. Medical bills are often unavoidable and can hold you back from achieving your financial goals. If you’re experiencing this burden, there is something you can do about it.

Ask your medical provider to give you an itemized list of your care and do some research on what a fair price for each service is in the Healthcare Bluebook. Call your health care provider’s financial services and ask to reduce your bill armed with your research. The same study found that 93 percent of those who negotiated had their bill lowered or dropped. If you want to join the majority of successful negotiators, use our tips below.

Best negotiation tactics and what to say:

  • Do your research:
    “My itemized receipt states that I was charged [insert price charged] for [insert health care service]. According to the Healthcare Bluebook, a fair price for this service in my area is [insert price]. I’d like to know what can be done to lower my bill.”
  • Make it personal by telling your story:
    “I’ve been through some tough medical problems recently and am also experiencing a financial burden from medical expenses. I can’t afford to pay this bill and would like to know if anything can be done to help my situation.”

Get a Better Gym Membership

Gym rates are often subject to monthly promotions or seasonal discounts, meaning that not everyone pays the same amount for the same services. Use this knowledge to your advantage and negotiate a better price for your gym membership.

Best negotiation tactics and what to say:

  • Ask questions:
    “I’d love to continue being a member at your gym. Do you have any promotions or incentives going on for a lower membership rate?”
  • Offer a bogey:
    “I currently pay $50 a month for a membership, but that price is getting to be too much for my budget. I was wondering if I gave up certain amenities, would I be able to get a discounted rate so that I can continue to be a member?”

It’s important to be an advocate for yourself and your financial well-being. Have confidence in your skills and use these negotiation tactics to score the best rates and better pay. Once you’ve successfully negotiated everything from your bills to your gym membership, remember to go into the Mint app and readjust your budgeting categories. With your budget rearranged, put your extra income and money saved toward achieving your financial goals.

 

negotiation-tactics-save-money-earn-more

Sources: Very Well Mind | Harvard Program on Negotiation | APPA | Psychology Today | Simply Psychology

The post 17 Negotiation Tactics and Tips To Help You Score the Best Deals appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Will Baby Boomers Dying Cause A Housing Decline?

I keep hearing from people that no one is talking about how all of the baby boomers are going to die soon and that will cause a housing crash. This idea may have been started by Robert Kiyosaki who wrote a book in 2002 about baby boomers creating a stock market crash in 2016. Obviously, … Read more

Source: investfourmore.com

What Careers Make the Most Money: 75 Jobs for Fuller Pockets

Deciding what career to pursue can be difficult when you don’t know where to start or don’t have a passion for a particular field yet. However, planning early on and researching things such as potential salary can help you feel eager to get your future started.

Choosing to follow a career field that pays a lot can be a difficult but rewarding process. Whether you’re a recent grad or changing careers, learning more about jobs that can help you live a comfortable life is the first step. In this guide, you’ll find out what careers make the most money and what you need to get started.

See Average U.S. Salaries

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The Benefits of a High-Paying Job

Choosing a career that pays well can be very beneficial for your future. If you are looking to start a family, build retirement savings, or travel around the world, finding a high-paying career can get you a step closer to your goals.

Although some people may say that money doesn’t bring you happiness, knowing that you have enough money for all your necessities, such as rent, bills, and groceries, can bring you peace of mind. A recent study shows that larger incomes are associated with a greater well-being and a higher level of satisfaction with life overall​​. In addition to that, it can also make you more productive and help you succeed at work.

the benefits of a high-paying career

What Careers Make the Most Money?

If you’re ready to find a career that will bring you financial security and are willing to persevere and work hard, here are the 75 best-paying jobs in the U.S. according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statics National Occupational and Wage Estimates:

1. Anesthesiologist

An anesthesiologist is a doctor that administers anesthetics and analgesics before, during, or after surgery. They are critical to surgery procedures since they allow the surgeon and other physicians to complete invasive procedures with no discomfort to the patient. In addition to administering general and regional anesthesia, they also closely monitor the patient’s vitals. Due to the risk involved, anesthesiology can be a stressful but rewarding career to follow.

  • Average Annual Salary: $271,440
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Internship (one year)
    • Residency (three years)
    • Obtain a state license

2. Surgeon

Working together with anesthesiologists, surgeons* operate on patients who have suffered from injuries or diseases. Surgeons are also leaders of the surgical team, so they have to make important decisions quickly, sometimes involving life or death. There are many different kinds of surgeons, and you can train to become a general surgeon or have a specialization such as neurology or cardiology. If you plan to become a surgeon, it’s necessary to understand the gravity of the job and have a passion for the STEM field.

  • Average Annual Salary: $251,650
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Residency (three to seven years)
    • Obtain a state license

See the Average Salary for Surgeons

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3. Obstetrician and Gynecologist

From providing reproductive system care to bringing a new life into the world, obstetricians and gynecologists play an important role in women’s health. They help prevent, diagnose, and treat conditions affecting the female reproductive system. As a gynecologist, you would primarily handle women’s reproductive health, and as an obstetrician, you would also deal with childbirth in the surgical field.

  • Average Annual Salary: $239,120
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Residency (four years)
    • Pass a written board exam
    • Practice (two years)
    • Pass an oral board exam

4. Orthodontist

If you’re amazed by how braces can help fix teeth irregularities, a career as an orthodontist may be for you. Orthodontists diagnose, examine, and treat imperfect positioning of teeth and oral cavity anomalies. By prescribing and installing braces, orthodontists help improve not only mouth and teeth function but also the appearance of patients’ smiles.

  • Average Annual Salary: $237,990
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Dental school (four years)
    • Pass a national board exam
    • Residency (two to three years)

5. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

If you’ve ever seen yourself as a dentist but you’re also amazed by how surgery procedures can better someone’s life, becoming an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is a great option for you. These surgeons are dentists with additional training who perform surgeries on the mouth, jaw, and face. They may also diagnose and treat problems in that area, as well as perform surgery to improve the function and appearance of the patient’s facial structure.

  • Average Annual Salary: $234,990
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Dental school (three to five years)
    • Residency (four to six years)
    • Board Certification

6. Physician

Just like surgeons, physicians* diagnose and treat illnesses or injuries and help maintain the patient’s overall health. There are two main types of physicians: doctors of osteopathy, who specialize in preventive medicine and holistic care, and doctors of medicine, who take a more scientific approach to diagnosis and treatment. However, within these types, you could choose to have a specialty such as urology, immunology, or radiology, to name a few.

  • Average Annual Salary: $218,850
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Internship
    • Residency according to specialization (three to eight years)

See the Average Salary for Physicians

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7. Psychiatrist

Mental health is as important as physical health, so if you’re fascinated about how the mind works, becoming a psychiatrist* will help you understand the relationship between the mind and body. Psychiatrists diagnose, treat, and help prevent mental disorders such as bipolar disorder, depression, and schizophrenia. They can also prescribe medications and recommend a patient be hospitalized.

  • Average Annual Salary: $217,100
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Obtain a license
    • Certification from the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
    • Residency (four years)

See the Average Salary for Psychiatrists

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8. Prosthodontists

Prosthodontists specialize in improving the function of your mouth. They diagnose and treat complex issues, as well as design and rehabilitate prostheses for patients who have trouble with their bite, missing teeth, or who want to improve their appearance. If you have a passion for physics, medicine, and have great attention to detail and some artistic skills, prosthodontics may be a great fit for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $214,870
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Dental school (four years)
    • Post-doctoral residency (three years)
    • Obtain a state license

9. Family Medicine Physician

If you don’t want to be tied to diagnosing and treating a particular health condition, becoming a family medicine physician can be a good career option. They diagnose, treat, and provide preventive care to families of all ages. As primary care providers, they are very versatile and can treat anything from a simple cough to a broken bone.

  • Average Annual Salary: $214,370
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Family medicine residency (four years)
    • Pass board exam

See the Average Salary for Physicians

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10. General Internal Medicine Physician

General internal medicine physicians diagnose and treat a variety of injuries and diseases relating to the internal organs. Commonly referred to as general internists, they primarily treat adults and adolescents and are trained to handle a broad spectrum of illnesses. If you enjoyed your anatomy science class in high school, this may be a good career path for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $210,960
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Internal medicine residency (three years)
    • Obtain board certification

11. Chief Executive

If leadership is your forte and you thrive by helping others achieve their goals, becoming a CEO can help you put your skills into action. At the highest level of management of a company, chief executives decide and formulate company policies according to the guidelines set up by a board of directors. They are not only tied to planning, directing, and coordinating operational activities within the company, but also act as a leader to help the company meet its goals.

  • Average Annual Salary: $197,840
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Business and industry experience

12. Dentist

Similar to orthodontists, dentists* also diagnose and treat issues with the mouth, gums, and teeth. Dentists treat more than just cavities — they extract teeth, perform teeth cleaning, and fit dentures. Another benefit of being a dentist is being able to build relationships with patients and see improvement with their teeth over time.

  • Average Annual Salary: $194,930
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Dental school (four years)
    • Pass National Board Dental Examinations

See the Average Salary for Dentists

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13. Nurse Anesthetist

Nurse anesthetists* administer anesthesia on patients as well as monitor their vital signs and their recovery. They are registered nurses who specialize in anesthesiology and assist surgeons and physicians to help them complete procedures. If you want to meet patients of all ages and from all walks of life and make them feel secure and calm before surgery, becoming a nurse anesthetist might be just right for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $189,190
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Registered nurse licensure
    • Experience in critical care (one year)
    • Nurse anesthesia program
    • Pass the national certification exam

See the Average Salary for Nurse Anesthetists

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14. Pilot

Are you an adrenaline junkie with a head for heights? If so, becoming an airline pilot can be a great way to make a living off your passion. Pilots* operate and fly airplanes that transport passengers and cargo. As a pilot, you can fly aircraft regionally, nationally, and internationally or even become a flight instructor. In addition to flying, pilots also make sure the aircraft is functioning properly, checking for malfunctions and needed maintenance, as well as ensuring the weather conditions and routes are safe.

  • Average Annual Salary: $186,870
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Military, college, or civilian flight school
    • Federal Air Transport certificate
    • ATP license (1,000-1,500 hours of flying)
    • Pass a medical exam

See the Average Salary for Pilots

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15. Pediatrician

If seeing children develop their skills and grow strong sounds fascinating to you, you can be part of their journey as a pediatrician*. Pediatricians diagnose, treat, and help prevent injuries and diseases in children from infancy to adulthood. For more specific treatment, they might also refer them to a specialist. Pediatricians tend to love being around children and can also acquire a subspecialty, such as oncology or developmental-behavioral pediatrics.

  • Average Annual Salary: $184,570
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Medical school (four years)
    • Pass a licensure exam
    • Residency (three years)
    • Obtain American Board of Pediatrics certification

See the Average Salary for Pediatricians

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16. Computer and Information Systems Manager

Technology is a big part of our lives these days, and if you’re good with computers and data, you might find a passion for this career. Computer and information systems managers plan, coordinate, and direct activities in electronic data processing, computer programming, information systems, and systems analysis. They are there to help companies and organizations navigate technology. In addition to supervising workers, they also help install and upgrade systems and protect them from potential threats.

  • Average Annual Salary: $161,730
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Graduate degree (recommended)
    • Industry certifications and experience

17. Architectural and Engineering Manager

From a small coffee shop to a huge skyscraper, do you ever wonder how buildings come to life? As an architectural and engineering manager, you would plan, direct, and coordinate architectural and engineering activities or work on research and development. Some managers work in offices designing and coordinating the creation of buildings that are safe and purposeful. Others may also work in research laboratories and construction sites.

  • Average Annual Salary: $158,100
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Graduate degree (recommended)
    • Industry certifications and experience

18. Natural Science Manager

If science was your favorite subject as a kid and you loved to do experiments, becoming a natural science manager might make your younger self very happy. Natural science managers supervise scientists such as chemists, physicists, and biologists by planning, directing, and coordinating activities in those fields. They may spend their time in labs or in the office coordinating production, testing, and quality control of research projects.

  • Average Annual Salary: $154,930
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Graduate degree (recommended)
    • Experience as a scientist

19. Marketing Manager

Are you a creative person with a love for problem-solving and communicating with others? If so, becoming a marketing manager* might be what you’re looking for. Marketing managers supervise the whole process of creating and implementing marketing campaigns. They determine the demands of products and services and identify potential customers and opportunities. In addition to developing strategies to maximize profits, they also provide help with hiring staff and team-building.

  • Average Annual Salary: $154,470
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Graduate degree (recommended)
    • Industry certifications and experience

20. Petroleum Engineer

Becoming a petroleum engineer* is the right path for you if you want to help provide the world with energy. Petroleum engineers design equipment to help extract oil and gas from the earth and determine the need for new tools and equipment. To do this, they spend a lot of time researching, studying, and analyzing data to find the safest and most cost-effective way to perform the extractions.

  • Average Annual Salary: $154,330
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Professional engineering license
    • Society of Petroleum Engineers certification (recommended)

21. Financial Manager

Financial managers* are responsible for the finances of a company by planning and directing accounting, insurance, securities, banking, and any other financial activities. Their tasks can range from creating financial reports, developing long-term financial goals, and directing investment activities. If you have a love for numbers and have great attention to detail and communication skills, this is the job for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $151,510
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Master’s degree (recommended)
    • Obtain some certifications and licensures

See the Average Salary for Financial Managers

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22. Podiatrist

If you want to join a critical field and make an impact in people’s lives by relieving their pain, becoming a podiatrist* might be the right step for you. Podiatrists are physicians who specialize in diagnosing and treating diseases and deformities of the human foot, ankle, and lower leg. They are able to perform surgeries and transplants, and can also prescribe medications and braces for less complex cases.

  • Average Annual Salary: $151,110
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Podiatric medical school (four years)
    • Residency (three years)
    • Pass American Podiatric Medical Licensing Exam

See the Average Salary for Podiatrists

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23. Lawyer

Representing clients in civil and criminal legal issues and disputes, lawyers can also advise clients on legal transactions and prepare legal documents. As a lawyer, you may work in the private sector for big firms and even small businesses, or work in the public sector for the government as a district attorney or public defender. If you have a passion for helping people and solving conflicts, this might be the right path for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $148,910
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
    • Law school (three years)
    • Pass a state-specific law exam
    • Internship experience

24. Sales Manager

Sales managers* direct an organization’s sales team by planning, directing, and coordinating the distribution of a product or service. Some duties may include establishing sales territories, setting quotas and goals, analyzing sales statistics, and training sales representatives. If you want to become a sales manager, you have to not only be great at selling but also making strategic decisions and motivating people.

  • Average Annual Salary: $147,580
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Master’s degree (recommended)
    • Industry experience and certifications

See the Average Salary for Sales Managers

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25. Advertising and Promotion Manager

As an advertising and promotion manager*, you would plan and coordinate advertising programs and policies. They build interest in purchasing products or services from their organization, as well as create marketing materials such as posters, giveaways, brochures, and coupons. If you want to have a job in which you can put your creativity to action, this is the right career for you.

  • Average Annual Salary: $147,560
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • Master’s degree (recommended)
    • Industry experience and certifications

50 Additional High-Paying Careers

If the careers mentioned above are not a fit for you, there are plenty of other jobs that pay a lot of money. Here are 50 additional careers that make the most money, listed by average annual salary:

  • Physicist* – $137,700
  • Compensation and Benefits Manager – $137,160
  • Astronomer – $136,480
  • Public Relations and Fundraising Manager* – $135,580
  • Law Teacher – $134,760
  • Human Resources Manager* – $134,580
  • Purchasing Manager* – $132,660
  • Judge* – $131,850
  • Computer and Information Research Scientist – $130,890
  • Air Traffic Controller* – $127,440
  • Computer Hardware Engineer – $126,140
  • Training and Development Manager* – $125,920
  • General and Operations Manager* – $125,740
  • Pharmacist* – $125,460
  • Optometrist* – $125,440
  • Nuclear Engineer – $125,130
  • Health Specialties Teacher – $124,890
  • Political Scientist – $124,100
  • Personal Service Manager – $123,980
  • Economics Teacher – $123,720
  • Actuary* – $123,180
  • Personal Financial Advisor* – $122,490
  • Aerospace Engineer* – $121,110
  • Economist* – $120,880
  • Computer Network Architect – $119,230
  • Medical and Health Services Manager – $118,800
  • Industrial Production Manager – $118,190
  • Sales Engineer* – $117,270
  • Physician Assistant* – $116,390
  • Nurse Midwife* – $115,540
  • Education Administrator* – $115,200
  • Chemical Engineer* – $114,820
  • Nurse Practitioner* – $114,510
  • Art Director* – $114,490
  • Software Developer* – $114,270
  • Engineering Teacher – $114,130
  • Industrial-Organizational Psychologist – $112,690
  • Mathematician – $112,530
  • Electronics Engineer* – $112,320
  • Geoscientist – $112,110
  • Air Transportation Worker – $111,420
  • Physical Scientist – $110,100
  • Veterinarian* – $108,120
  • Administrative Services and Facilities Manager – $108,120
  • Information Security Analyst* – $107,580
  • Business Teacher – $107,270
  • Construction Manager* – $107,260
  • Electrical Engineer* – $105,990
  • Biochemist – $104,810
  • Microbiologist* – $91,840

Deciding your future is never easy, but planning in advance can not only give you peace of mind but help you achieve your goals faster. If having financial freedom and emotional well-being is a priority to you, having a high-paying job can help you achieve that. It’s not always easy to do, and having a job with a high salary will be demanding. Now that you went through the list of careers that make the most money, you can feel inspired to begin following your dreams.

How to Land a High-Paying Career

Methodology

In order to find out the top 75 careers that make the most money, we used data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statics National Occupational and Wage Estimates from May 2020. The average annual salary is the data provided under annual mean age and sorted from highest to lowest. To calculate the average of what Americans spend their yearly salary on, we used the average expenditure per consumer unit research. To achieve the percentages, we added up the income quintiles percentages provided in Table C for each category and divided them by 5, which resulted in the average percentage spend.

*The salaries in Mint’s Salary tool have a different source and might differ from the ones listed from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Indeed | Monster | BLS Expenditures | PNAS | AmeriTrade

The post What Careers Make the Most Money: 75 Jobs for Fuller Pockets appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com