A 3% mortgage rate may be the new norm

For the third consecutive week, mortgage rates pushed past 3% – with the average mortgage rate for a 30-year fixed loan up four basis points last week to 3.09%, according to Freddie Mac’s Primary Mortgage Market Survey.

Rising mortgage rates typically signify a recovering economy, and despite applications for mortgages dropping week-over-week, Freddie Mac’s chief economist Sam Khater expects a 3% rate to sustain market interest for many potential buyers.

A number of economists say rising rates may just be what the industry needs to cool the insane housing demand the market has been struggling to maintain for months. Increased inventory was the initial hope. However, due to consistent materials supply shortages and lumber prices that are up about 200% since April 2020, builders’ confidence index dropped in March. Single-family housing starts declined last month.

“The elevated price of lumber is adding approximately $24,000 to the price of a new home,” said NAHB Chairman Chuck Fowke. â€œThough builders continue to see strong buyer traffic, recent increases for material costs and delivery times, particularly for softwood lumber, have depressed builder sentiment this month. Policymakers must address building material supply chain issues to help the economy sustain solid growth in 2021.”

Now, economists are keeping a watchful eye on the speed in which interest rates have risen, said Doug Duncan, Fannie Mae’s senior vice president and chief economist.

“Underlying Treasury rates have risen, though lenders have absorbed some of the rise by shrinking spreads, as confirmed by our recent Mortgage Lender Sentiment Survey results,” said Duncan. “While the rate rise will curtail refinances to some degree, 2021 is poised to be a good year overall for housing activity and housing finance, as the economy continues to recover and COVID-19 restrictions ease.”

Duncan said Fannie Mae is watching for risks around monetary and fiscal policy on interest rates moving forward, though none are an immediate threat as the Federal Reserve has not changed its FOMC statement for several months.

Nevertheless, mortgage rates remain near historic lows (they are still 0.8 percentage points below the 2019 average), but if the price of housing can’t cool in time, many first-time homebuyers may miss the chance to take out a record low rate. Despite this risk, Fannie Mae’s baseline view is that the recent rapid rise will not continue but that rates will drift only modestly higher over the remainder of this year.

“Essentially, we believe the Fed will keep policy accommodative for longer, not tightening until inflation clearly exceeds its 2.0-percent target for a substantial period,” Fannie Mae said. “This view is consistent with current market measures, such as Fed Funds futures, not anticipating any rate hikes until 2023 and, even then, at a slow pace.”

The post A 3% mortgage rate may be the new norm appeared first on HousingWire.

Source: housingwire.com

Home sellers are feeling good about 2021

Home sellers are chomping at the bit. As the economy reopens, vaccinations continue to roll out and stimulus checks reach bank accounts across America, home sellers are increasingly optimistic.

And despite fierce bidding wars, competition from institutional investors and sore wrists from writing dozens of heartfelt letters to home sellers, even buyers are growing in courage these days.

Fannie Mae’s Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI), a composite index designed to track the housing market and consumer confidence to sell or buy a home, increased in March by 5.2 points to 81.7.

Four of the HPSI’s six components increased month over month, including the components related to homebuying and home selling conditions, household income, and home prices. The mortgage rate outlook component experienced the only decline in March’s HPSI, with the latest results indicating that only 6% of consumers believe that mortgage rates will decrease over the next 12 months.

Fannie Mae Senior Vice President and Chief Economist Doug Duncan said the March HPSI increase reflects consumer optimism toward the housing market and the economy in general.


Real estate agents and LOs: the great collaboration

Technology has given consumers the power of choice and expedited the entire real estate purchasing process. Successful agents, brokerages and loan officers of the future are going to rely significantly on technology to find, nurture and engage with buyers and home sellers while also playing an expanding role as personal advisors.

Presented by: Propertybase

“There might even more intensity this year, since 2020’s spring homebuying season was limited by virus-related lockdowns,” Duncan said. “Home-selling sentiment experienced positive momentum across most consumer segments, nearly reaching pre-pandemic levels and generally indicative of a strong home seller’s market.”

Duncan added that home sellers are citing high home prices and tight inventory as primary reasons why it’s a good time to sell.

“Alternatively, while the net ‘good time to buy’ component increased month over month, it has not recovered to pre-pandemic levels, as the homebuying experience continues to prove difficult for many of the same reasons,” he said.

(The percentage of respondents who say it is a good time to buy a home increased from 48% to 53%, while the percentage who say it is a bad time to buy decreased from 43% to 40%.)

Mortgage applications decreased 2.2%, according to the March 31 report from the Mortgage Bankers Association. However, purchase activity during the last week of March was up 6% year-over-year, with the unadjusted purchase index 39% higher than the same week one year prior.

That’s largely reflected in the HPSI. The percentage of respondents who believe it is a good time to sell a home increased from 55% to 61%, while the percentage who say it’s a bad time to sell decreased from 35% to 28%.

The percentage of respondents who believe home prices will go up in the next 12 months increased from 47% to 50%, while the percentage who say home prices will go down decreased from 18% to 14%. The share who think home prices will stay the same remained unchanged at 29%.

Only a handful of people thought mortgage rates would tick down in the next year, at 6%, a decrease from 8% the prior month. Mortgage rates are officially out of the 2% range homebuyers were taking advantage of in 2020, with the most recent report showing rates at 3.27% for a vanilla 30-year fixed mortgage.

Higher rates aside, consumers seem to be feeling better about the economy, as the percentage of respondents who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago increased from 17% to 25%, while the percentage who say their household income is significantly lower decreased from 19% to 15%. The percentage who say their household income is about the same decreased from 61% to 56%.

Likewise, the percentage of respondents who are not concerned about losing their job in the next 12 months remained unchanged at 82%, while the percentage who say they are concerned also remained unchanged at 17%.

The post Home sellers are feeling good about 2021 appeared first on HousingWire.

Source: housingwire.com

Paying Off Debt to Buy a House

A brown brick house at sunset

When you buy a house, a big part of a lender’s decision whether to approve your mortgage rests on whether or not you can afford it.If you have a lot of debt, the monthly payments on those obligations chip away at the total amount you can pay each month on a mortgage.

But that doesn’t mean it’s impossible to buy a house if you’re in debt. It’s just a bit more challenging. If you want to stop paying rent and enter the exciting world of homeownership, here’s how you can pay off debt to buy a house.

1. Calculate Your Debt to Income Ratio

Your debt-to-income ratio, often called DTI ratio, is a measurement that compares the amount of debt you have to your income. It helps determine how much you can actually afford when it comes to mortgage payments.

How Much Debt Can You Have and Still Qualify for a Mortgage?

Most lenders won’t approve you if your DTI is higher than around 43%.

For example, let’s say you make $52,000 a year. This means your gross income each month is around $4,333. If half your paycheck is devoted to paying off debts, then about $2,166 of your income goes towards paying off your various debts.

By these numbers, your DTI would be 50%. The bank would probably not approve you for a mortgage since your DTI is higher than the maximum 43%. To fix this problem, you can do one of two things: start making more money and/or lower your monthly recurring debt payments.

2. Find Ways to Decrease Your Debt

Consolidate Loans

Qualifying for a mortgage partially depends on what part of your monthly gross income is paid towards the minimum amount due on recurring bills. These might include credit card bills, student loan payments, car loans and other payments. Consolidating can be a way to reduce that amount.

What does consolidating mean? Consider an example where you have five credit card payments each month. Consolidating them means that instead of making five separate payments to individual lenders, you make onepayment each month.

If your credit is good enough, you may be able to get a consolidation loan with better terms. That means your one consolidated payment may be lower than the five payments combined. You can consolidate student loans, too, and get the same potential benefits.

After you’ve consolidated, you can re-calculate your DTI ratio. If it’s lower, you may fall below the DTI threshold required to be approved for a mortgage.

Pay Off or Pay Down Some Debt

If you make an effort to pay off or pay down some of your existing debt, this can help decrease your DTI ratio and make your financial picture look more favorable to lenders. It may be best to concentrate on paying off recurring debts, such as credit cards, to help your chances.

Is It Best to Pay Off Debt Before Buying a House?

There’s no one right answer to this question. It can depend on your mortgage lender. Your mortgage lender may want you to pay off debt before making a down payment while others may be okay with your DTI and want a larger down payment. If you’re under the 43% DTI and have a good credit history, you might consider working with a mortgage lender to find out what your options are.

Credit Repair

If any debts listed on your credit report aren’t yours, this could be hurting your overall financial health. Make sure to closely examine the details of your credit report and make sure the accounts listed are actually ones you’re responsible for. If you do notice errors on your credit report, you can work to repair your credit by disputing the entries.

3. Find Ways to Increase Your Income

One of the ways to make your DTI more favorable is to increase your income. You can usually do this by either getting a better paying job or by getting a second job if you have the means. If you’re married and are applying for a mortgage with your joint income, perhaps your spouse can get a job to help increase their income. One drawback to this solution is that it’s a long-term solution and not a short-term one. Getting a new job, whether primary or secondary, takes time and effort.

4. Consider Making a Down Payment

Contrary to popular belief, a 20% down payment on a home isn’t required in many cases. FHA loans, for instance, only require 3.5% down, and some mortgage lenders may only ask for 5% down on a conventional loan.

However, keep in mind that the more you put down upfront, the less your monthly payments are and the lower your interest rate is likely to be. If you can put more money down, it makes the mortgage more affordable. If you’re hovering at the higher end of an acceptable DTI ratio, that may make a difference.

Looking at the Big Picture

When you’re ready to buy a house, it’s important to consider your level of debt, how much money you have coming in and your job security. If you’re able to consolidate your debt and get lower monthly payments as a result, your job is well-paying and seems secure and your credit is excellent, you can probably buy a home even if you have other debts.

Assess the Risks

Remember that just because you might qualify for a home loan doesn’t mean you should buy a house. Stretching your limits to meet that 43% DTI ratio can be risky unless you foresee your income continuing to rise oryou know any debt obligations you have are set to be paid off in the future.

Can Paying Off Debt Hurt My Credit Score?

Most of the time, paying off debt has a neutral or positive impact to your credit score. First, you decrease your credit utilization, which accounts for 30% of your credit score. A lower credit utilization can bring up your score. Second, you show the lender that you have the means to pay off debts, which can be a positive factor in whether you’re approved.

However, in a few cases, paying off debt could lower your score. If you pay off old accounts, you could change the age of your credit. How old your accounts are play a role in your score. You could also reduce your credit mix, which also factors into your score.

Neither of these factors plays as large a role as credit utilization, though. And if your mortgage company wants to see you with less outstanding debt, a tiny and temporary hit to your credit score may be worth getting approved for a loan.

To find out more about your credit score and where you stand with financial health, sign up for a free Credit Report Card today. You’ll get feedback about the five major areas that impact your score and how you can improve them before applying for a mortgage.

The post Paying Off Debt to Buy a House appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

How to Refinance Your Mortgage with Bad Credit

Refinancing your mortgage can provide you with a lot of financial benefits. You can cash out on some of your home’s equity when you need a large sum of money. You can also take advantage…

The post How to Refinance Your Mortgage with Bad Credit appeared first on Crediful.

Source: crediful.com

Choosing the Best Mortgage Lender

The process of finding the best mortgage loan begins with finding the best mortgage lender. They can ensure this process runs smoothly, you get the best rates, and any issues are dealt with in a timely and satisfactory manner.

But with so many different lenders, how do you know which one is right for you?

How to Find the Best Lender and Get the Best Mortgage Rates

The following tips should help you to find the best mortgage rates and lenders, potentially saving you a great deal of time, stress, and money.

1. Improve Your Credit Score

Your credit score is an important part of the mortgage process and is considered for all loans and new lines of credit. It tells lenders what kind of borrower you are and is used to determine the likelihood that you will default on your debt. If the likelihood is high and your credit score is low, you may be refused a new mortgage altogether.

There are types of mortgages that don’t require high credit scores, including those backed by the FHA. However, your credit score will still be considered and will influence the interest rate you’re offered.

2. Improve Your Debt-to-Income Ratio

Can your finances bear the weight of a new loan, one that comes with a large upfront payment and a large monthly payment? By calculating your debt-to-income ratio you can find out.

Your debt-to-income ratio estimates your affordability by comparing your monthly debt payments to your gross monthly income. For example, if you have an income of $3,000 and monthly debt payments of $600, your debt-to-income ratio is 20%, as $600 is 20% of $3,000.

Anything under 43% should be accepted once your mortgage payments have been added to the total. Some mortgage lenders will go as high as 50%. However, the higher it is, the more at-risk you are by adding new debt to your total, because once you add living costs and bills to the mix, you’ll be left with very little cash and will be one unexpected bill from complete disaster.

Reduce your debt-to-income ratio as much as possible before you apply for any new credit.

3. Reduce Your Budget

The right loan amount is more important than the right mortgage lender. The majority of borrowers overestimate how much they can afford, stretch their budgets to the maximum, and suffer the consequences years down the line. 

Most homeowners have regrets and for many, the biggest regret is not buying a cheaper house and believing they can afford more than they actually can. Your monthly mortgage payment shouldn’t stretch you too thin, nor should it leave you crippled financially. There should be some room to maneuver, some room to make extra payments when you can and to use that money for other bills and expenses when you can’t.

Think twice about spending big on your dream home and look at the benefits of getting a cheaper house. For instance, you’ll require a smaller mortgage total, could secure a better interest rate, can get a shorter term, and, therefore, will pay much less over the life of the loan.

A fixed-rate mortgage over 15-years will cost less than the same rate over 40-years. With the former, as much as 60% of your initial monthly payment could go towards the principal, and that will increase every month from there. With the latter, you could be paying just 20% to 30% towards your principal, which means you’ll clear equity at a snail’s pace.

4. Think About Your Options

You have more options than you realize when it comes to mortgage lenders and loan programs. These options include:

Conventional Loans

A conventional home loan is one that’s not backed by any government agency and typically requires a 20% down payment. These loans often used a fixed rate of interest but there are also adjustable-rate versions known as Hybrid ARMs.

Conventional loans can be conforming, which means they are less than the maximum limits set by the Federal Housing Finance Agency and meet the standards required by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, or non-conforming. There are also low down payment versions where as little as 3% is required. However, in such cases, borrowers will be asked to pay Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) until 20% equity is attained.

FHA Loans

​FHA loans are backed by the Federal Housing Administration and offered by traditional lenders. The down payments are smaller and there is built-in insurance protection to cover the lender in the event that the borrower fails to keep up with monthly mortgage payments.

Borrowers need a credit score of 500 and a down payment of 10% or a credit score of 580 and a down payment of 3.5% to get an FHA loan. As a result of these reduced requirements, FHA loans may be better suited for most first-time home buyers, but that doesn’t necessarily make an FHA loan the best choice. What’s more, as they are offered by multiple mortgage companies, you still need to find the right lender and lock-in the best rate.

VA Loans

Offered by the Department of Veteran Affairs, these loans make it easier for military veterans and active personnel to get home loans. You can get a VA loan with no down payment and 90% of borrowers do just that. However, as with all other types of loans, by increasing your down payment you can reduce your rate.

USDA Loans

Offered by the United States Department of Agriculture, these loans don’t require a down payment and can be used for homes in rural areas.

Down Payments

One of the most important aspects of the home buying process is the down payment, which is the amount that you pay upfront. The higher this amount is, the lower your mortgage loan needs to be and the less interest you will pay as a result. What’s more, a down payment can also take you above the magical 20% mark with a conventional loan. 

Not only will this massively reduce your total interest, but it will negate the need for Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) which could cost you as much as $100 a month on the average house purchase.

Many borrowers overlook these benefits because they focus on the short term. They don’t care if they are paying 50% more over the life of the loan, as the house is still technically theirs and the end result will be exactly the same. If they’re not paying much more per month and don’t notice the impact on a month to month basis, what’s the point?

The point it, you could save huge sums of money over the life of the loan and own 100% of your house much sooner. This gives you more options in the future with regards to equity loans, cash-out refinancing, and more. 

It also prevents any issues for your heirs when if you die before the mortgage clears in full. This way, you’re leaving them a house that is fully paid off and can be passed on directly, as opposed to one that has debt attached and needs to be handed down with that debt and that responsibility.

5. Compare and Get Pre-Approval

The next step is to work with mortgage lenders and mortgage brokers, see which ones work best for you and can provide you with what you need. You can look into online lenders, banks, and credit unions, check online reviews, speak with friends and family, ask experts, and generally do everything you can to find the best one. Ultimately, however, it all comes down to what they can offer you.

Once you find the one that is right for you, the one that offers the lowest rate and gives you what you need, you can get a pre-approval. The lender will check your credit report and give you a loan estimate, which will give you an idea of how much you can borrow and what you can expect to pay.

It’s worth noting, however, that this pre-approval isn’t set in stone. It is subject to additional checks performed prior to the loan. If you apply for a lot of credit cards and lose your job between pre-approval and mortgage, you’ll likely be rejected and that contract will be ripped up.

6. Check the Small Print

Don’t let your excitement get the better of you, don’t be too eager. Read the small print, make sure you understand the loan terms and know what sort of origination fees and other closing costs you’ll be expected to pay. These differ from lender to lender and some of them can be negotiated, so don’t assume that they are standard across the board and can’t be changed.

If you’re not sure about any step of the process, ask questions. If you feel a little out of your depth, do some more research. We have countless articles on mortgages here and can help with everything from mortgage terms to the actual mortgage application, after which we can guide you towards the best strategies for paying off your balance.

Choosing the Best Mortgage Lender is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Should You Buy A House When You’re In Debt? Things To Consider First

Buying a home is part of the American Dream. These days many people are delaying that dream, due to being in debt. But should they?

The post Should You Buy A House When You’re In Debt? Things To Consider First appeared first on Bible Money Matters and was written by Melissa. Copyright © Bible Money Matters – please visit biblemoneymatters.com for more great content.

Source: biblemoneymatters.com

Salary Needed to Afford Home Payments in the 15 Largest U.S. Cities – 2021 Edition

Image shows a suburban home with a snow-covered lawn and trees surrounding it. In this study, SmartAsset found the salary needed to afford home payments in the 15 largest U.S. cities.

Housing costs eat up more of the average American’s salary each month than any other single expense, reaching about one third of average expenditures in 2019, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. And while homeownership is coded into the DNA of the American Dream, buying a home isn’t easy for many. Car payments, student loans, credit card bills and other debts can make it difficult to qualify for a home loan and keep up with mortgage payments. That’s why SmartAsset analyzed data from the 15 biggest U.S. cities to estimate how much money you will need to make – and not exceed the recommended 36% debt-to-income ratio – to afford monthly home payments.

Our study compares these cities using the following factors: median home value, property tax rate, down payment, homeowners insurance and other monthly non-mortgage debt payments. For details on our data sources and how we put all the information together to create our final rankings, check out the Data and Methodology section below.

This is SmartAsset’s fourth study on the salary needed to afford home payments in the 15 largest U.S. cities. Check out the 2020 version of the study here.

Key Findings

  • California is expensive. Three California cities – San Jose, Los Angeles and San Diego – are included in the 15 largest U.S. cities, and they all rank within the top four of this study, at first, third and fourth, respectively (with New York City claiming second place). Our findings show that living in California can be very costly if you want to own a home. The average salary (with no additional debt) needed to afford home payments across these three cities is $111,533.
  • Home prices vary by more than 5x. Homes in big cities are usually more expensive than homes in suburbs or small towns. But our study reveals that there is also a big difference among the 15 largest U.S. cities. The highest median home value on our list is higher than five times more expensive than the lowest. San Jose, California has a median home value of almost $1 million, while San Antonio, Texas has a median home value of just $171,100.

1. San Jose, CA

Homeowners in San Jose, California need to have the highest income out of all 15 cities to afford their home payments. Our study shows that they have to earn $143,233 (with no debt) to afford a property with a median home value of $999,900. That income goes up to $159,900 when a homeowner has $500 in monthly debt payments, $168,233 if he or she owes $750 a month and $176,657 with $1,000 of additional monthly debt. On a more affordable note, the property tax rate in San Jose is relatively low, at 0.76%.

2. New York, NY

The Big Apple comes in second, but if you want to buy a home in New York City, you will need to earn at least $98,867 with no additional debt to afford house payments. If you owe $1,000 in monthly debt payments, you will need to make $132,200. The median home value in NYC is $680,800, and the median real estate tax bill is $5,633.

3. Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles’ median home value is slightly higher than New York City’s and the second-highest in the study ($697,200). The property tax rate, however, is the second-lowest overall – at just 0.68%. If you have no debt, you’ll need to earn at least $98,333 to make home payments and keep your debt-to-income ratio less than 36%. But if you owe $500 each month, you’ll need an income of at least $115,000.

4. San Diego, CA

San Diego, California’s median home value is $658,400, fourth-highest in the study. The average property tax rate, however, is third-lowest at 0.69%. If you have monthly debt payments of $1,000 before you take out a mortgage, you’ll need to earn at least $126,367 to afford house payments in San Diego. By comparison, if you have a monthly debt of $750, you will need to make $118,033.

5. Austin, TX

Austin, Texas homeowners without debt must earn a minimum of $64,600 to make their housing payments. Their income requirements rise to $81,267 if they have a monthly debt payment of $500. The median home value in Austin is significantly lower when compared to the top four cities on this list, at just $378,300. But the property tax rate is more than twice as high, at 1.75%.

6. Chicago, IL

The median home value in the Windy City is $275,200. Chicago homeowners have to pay a fairly high property tax rate, at 1.54%. If they do not have any monthly debts, they’ll need to earn at least $45,400 to afford monthly home payments without exceeding the 36% debt-to-income ratio. If they owe $1,000 in debt payments outside of their mortgage, they’ll need to earn $78,733.

7. Dallas, TX

Dallas has the fifth-highest property tax rate in this study, at 1.66%. The median home value in the city is $231,400. Homeowners without a debt must earn at least $38,933. But if they owe $750 in monthly debt, they’ll need to make at least $63,933 to afford a mortgage.

8. Charlotte, NC

Charlotte, North Carolina has a median home value of $252,100 and a property tax rate of 0.94%. Homeowners here must earn $37,367 without any additional debt to afford housing payments. If you owe $500 in monthly debt payments outside of your mortgage, you’ll need to make at least $54,033 for your housing payments.

9. Forth Worth, TX

The property tax rate in Fort Worth is 1.98%, the highest rate across all 15 cities. The median home value is $209,400, and homeowners with additional monthly debt payments of $750 need to make $62,100 to live comfortably in this city. By comparison, if their non-mortgage debt payments are only $500 each month, they will need to earn $53,767.

10. Phoenix, AZ

The property tax rate in Phoenix, Arizona is 0.58%, the lowest in this study. The median home value is $266,600. Homeowners can afford making mortgage payments with an income of $36,867 as long as they have no other debt. But if they have $750 in monthly debt payments, they’ll need earn at least $61,867.

11. Houston, TX

Houston’s property tax rate, like in the other Texan cities in the top 15, is fairly high – third-highest in the study, in fact, at 1.78%. The median home value, though, is much lower on the list, at $195,800. To afford the home payments without breaking the 36% debt-to-income rule, you’ll need to earn at least $50,267 if you have $500 in other monthly debt payments. If you’ve managed to stay debt-free before the mortgage, you’ll only need $33,600 in annual income.

12. San Antonio, TX

The median property tax rate in San Antonio, Texas is 1.91%, the second-highest property tax rate in the study. The median home value is $171,100. To afford payments on the median San Antonio home, you’ll need to earn at least $29,967 and have no additional debt payments. If you owe a monthly debt of $1,000 outside of your mortgage, you’ll need to earn at least $63,300 to afford home payments comfortably.

13. Jacksonville, FL

Jacksonville, Florida’s median home value is $200,200, and the property tax rate is relatively low at 0.87%. This means that you’ll need to make $29,300 to afford an average house payment as long as you have no additional monthly debt. If you are making other debt payments of $500 each month, you’ll need to earn at least $45,967 to afford home payments in Jacksonville comfortably.

14. Columbus, OH

Columbus, Ohio’s property tax rate is 1.60%, and the median home value is $173,300. Homeowners with additional debt payments of $500 each month must earn at least $45,533. Doubling monthly non-mortgage debt payments to $1,000 means that they’ll need a salary of at least $62,200.

15. Philadelphia, PA

The median home value in the city of Brotherly Love is $183,200, and the property tax rate is 0.91%. If you have no other debt, you’ll need a salary of at least $27,000 to make home payments in Philadelphia. If you owe $750 in monthly debt payments outside of your mortgage, you will have to earn a minimum of $52,000 per year.

Data and Methodology

To find the minimum required salary to afford home payments in the 15 largest U.S. cities, we used data from the U.S. Census Bureau. First, we took the median home value in each city and calculated the cost of a 20% down payment. We then used the average real estate taxes paid in each city and the median home value to find the average property tax rate. Using those figures and our mortgage calculator, we found the average monthly home payment in each city assuming a homebuyer would get a 30-year mortgage with a 3% interest rate for 80% of the home value (the balance after paying a 20% down payment). We also factored in an annual homeowners insurance payment of 0.35%.

After finding the average monthly home payment, we calculated the income needed to make those payments while not exceeding a 36% debt-to-income ratio. We also considered the necessary income to make home payments based on prospective homebuyer debt levels, which ranged from no monthly debt payments to debt payments totaling $1,000 per month.

We ranked each city from the highest minimum income (with no additional debt) needed to afford home payments to the lowest minimum income (with no additional debt) needed. Median home values and median household incomes are from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 1-year American Community Survey.

Tips for Homeownership

  • Feel at home in your finances with a trusted advisor. Want to buy a house and make sure your finances stay sound? Consider working with a financial advisor. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with financial advisors in your area in five minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors, get started now.
  • Be realistic. Make sure you know how much house you can afford before you even start looking at homes so you don’t fall in love with a unit that is above your price range.
  • Budgeting is key. If you want to start saving for a down payment, make a budget and designate a certain amount to put aside for that each month.

Questions about our study? Contact press@smartasset.com.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/KenWiedemann

The post Salary Needed to Afford Home Payments in the 15 Largest U.S. Cities – 2021 Edition appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

What Is A Consumer Loan?

A consumer loan is a loan or line of credit that you receive from a lender.

Consumer loans can be auto loans, home mortgages, student loans, credit cards, equity loans, refinance loans, and personal loans.

This article will address each type of consumer loans.

Get Approved for personal loan today.

Types of consumer loans:

Consumer loans are divided into several kinds of categories. They include auto loans, student loans, home loans, personal loans and credit cards. Regardless of type, consumer loans have one thing in common: you have to repay the loan at some period of time. 

Auto loans

Most people who are thinking of buying a car will apply for an auto loan. That is because buying a car is expensive.

In fact, it is the second largest expense you will ever make besides buying a house. And unless you intend to buy it with all cash, you will need a car loan.

So, car loans allow consumers to purchase a vehicle where they may not have the money upfront. With an auto loan, your payment is broken into smaller repayments that you will make over time every month.

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You can choose between a fixed or variable interest rate loan. But the most important thing is, whether you’re buying a new or used car, it’s important to compare loans to help you find the right auto loan for your needs.

Start comparing auto loans now!

Home loans

Another, and most common, type of consumer loans are home loans. A home loan or mortgage is a loan a consumer receives for the purpose of buying a house.

Buying a house is, undoubtedly, the biggest expense you’ll ever make in your life. So, for the majority of consumers who want to purchase a house, they will need to borrow the money from a lender.

Home loans are paid back over a period of time. Those mortgages term are typically 15 to 30 years. They can be variable rate or fixed rate. A fixed rate means that your repayments are locked in for a fixed term.

Whereas a variable rate means that your repayments depend on the interest rate going up or down when the Federal Reserve changes the rate.

Over the loan’s term, you will pay back the principle amount of the loan plus interest. This makes it very important to compare home loans. Doing so allows you to save thousands of dollars on interest and fees.

Personal Loans

The most common types of consumer loans are personal loans. That is because a personal loan can be used for a lot of things.

A personal loan allows a consumer to borrow a sum of money. The borrower agrees to repay the loan (plus interest) in installments over a period of time.

A personal loan is usually for a lower amount than a home loan or even an auto loan. People usually ask for $500 to $20,000 or more.

A personal loan can be secured (the consumer backs it with his or her personal assets) or unsecured (the consumer does not have to use his or her personal asset).

But most of them are unsecured, so getting approved for one will depend on your credit score, income and other factors.

But consumers use personal loans for different purposes. People take out personal loans to consolidate debts, such as credit card debts. You can use personal loans for a wedding, a holiday, to renovate your home, to buy a flt screen TV, etc…

Student Loans

Consumers use these types of loans to finance their education. There are two types of student loans: federal and private. The federal government funds a federal student loan.

Whereas, a private entity funds a private student loan. Generally, federal student loans are better because they come at a lower interest rate.

Credit Cards

Believe it or not credit cards is a type of consumer loans and they are very common. Consumers use this type of loan to finance every day expenses with the promise of paying back the money with interest.

Unlike other loans, however, every time your pay with your credit card, you take a personal loan.

Credit cards usually carry a higher interest rate than the other loans. But you can avoid these interests if you pay your balance in full immediately.

Small Business Loans

Another type of consumer loans are small business loans. These loans are used specifically to create a business or to expand an already established business.

Banks and the Small Business Administration (SBA) usually provide these loans. Small Business Loans are different than personal loans, because you usually have to provide a collateral to get the loan.

The collateral serves as a way to protect the lender in case you default on the loan. In addition, you will also need to provide a business plan for the lenders to review.

Home Equity Loans

If you have your own home, you can borrow money against it. These types of consumer loans are called home equity loans. If you’ve paid off the mortgage on the home, you can borrow up to the full value of the home.

Vice versa, if you’ve paid half of the mortgage on the home, you can borrow half of the value of the house. You can use a home equity loan for several purposes like you would with a personal loan.

But most consumers use this type of loan to renovate their house.  One disadvantage of this type of loan, however, is that you can lose your house in case of a default, because your house is used as a collateral for the loan.

Refinance loan

Loan refinancing is a basically taking a new loan to replace an existing one. But you get this loan specifically either to refinance your existing mortgage or to refinance your student loans or a personal loan.

Consumers usually refinance in order to receive a lower interest rate or to reduce the amount of monthly payments they are making on their existing loans.

However, reducing to a lower payment will lengthen the time to pay off the loan and you will accrue interest as a result.

Consumers also use this type of loan to pay their existing loans off faster. However, some mortgage refinancing loans come with prepayment penalties. So do you research in order to avoid that extra charge.

The bottom line is consumer loans can help you with your goals. However, understanding different loan types is important so that you can choose the best one that fits your particular situation.

So do you need a consumer loan?

Get Approved for personal loan today.

Speak with the Right Financial Advisor

If you have questions about your finances, you can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is making more money, paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

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