How to Get Out Of Debt Fast When You Don’t Have Much Money

The post How to Get Out Of Debt Fast When You Don’t Have Much Money appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

How do you get out of debt when you are broke? After all, if you had the money,  you would not be in debt in the first place.  Right?

I hear this from people, just like you.  It is often not how much money you make, but the debt payoff plan you are using that is not working.  It is possible to get out of debt with no money; you just need to learn how.

get out of debt

There are plenty of inspiring stories of people sharing how they got out of debt, despite not making much money. In fact, you may feel you relate.  But yet, you don’t think you can do it. For whatever reason, you think you can’t get out of debt as they did.  It is impossible.

Or is it?

My husband and I were living on one income when we decided it was time to get out of debt.  It took us nearly 2 1/2 years but were able to pay off more than $37,000 in debt.  There are countless other stories of our readers who have paid off similar amounts in even less time.

I am here to tell you that you CAN (and should) get out of debt – no matter how little money you may make!!

 

HOW CAN YOU GET OUT OF DEBT WITH NO MONEY?

I am going to share the steps anyone can follow to learn how to get out of debt – no matter your income level.  If you struggle to make ends meet, you already know how to make the most of a dollar, and I’ll give you additional tips so that you can pay down that debt.

I have asked this on Facebook all of the time, and some of the comments include:

“There is no way I can do this. Not with my medical bills.”

“Sure, that only works or some people – not me.”

Many of you may be thinking similar things, and I completely understand that way of thinking. I was there myself and know that it seems like an unattainable goal.  That is why you are reading this right now – to find out how to make this dream a reality.

Debt is NOT a Good Thing.

If you are in debt, it could be because of your own decisions or even those you can’t control (such as health, job loss, etc.).  No matter how it happened, you need to get rid of it. Period.

The reason you need to eliminate your debt is that it genuinely is holding you back. How can you move forward financially with this obstacle standing in your way?  If you found that you needed to buy a new car, you would find a way, correct?  For most, that would probably mean an additional monthly payment – but you would do it because you needed to.  You need to look at debt the same way:

“Getting out of debt is not a desire – it is a need.”

MY STORY

I remember in 2009 when my husband and I thought there was no way we could get ever get out from under our debt.  It was an impossible dream. At that time, I was not working at that time, and so we had one income and two young children to feed.  I initially thought that there was no way at all that we could do this.  It was just not possible.

We started by looking at our finances (oh – they were awful).  Our goal was to live a great life.  We could have kept on and kept just getting by, but that was not how we wanted to live. Just “getting by” was no longer an option.

Knowing our kids would be watching us, we knew the importance of being a good role model for them.  We wanted them to learn how to handle money by following our example.

We both agreed that not having debt was pivotal in having a positive financial future. We wanted this not only for ourselves but also for our children as well. It was also essential for our marriage.  We needed to remove anything that could potentially cause stress – money, and finances being a big one.  Our relationship was good, but we knew we could even make it better.

To begin our journey, we read Dave Ramsey’s Total Money Makeover. We followed much of his advice but figured out some things that worked for us as well. Being debt free is a fantastic feeling that no one can describe.  You have to live it.

 

THE FIRST STEP TO GET OUT OF DEBT

The very first step to getting out of debt is to decide you want to do it.  That was the change both my husband, and I made.  Once we were ready and committed to getting out of debt, we began our journey.

You might be saying that you can’t do that though.  I’m here to say that you can – when you really, truly want to make it happen.

Getting out of debt doesn’t require you to be rich. Anyone can do it.  Even if you have a low income or don’t have much money. Like I said above, knowing that you want to make the changes and pay off your debt is only one small part.  The more significant issue is how in the world you actually can do this.

 

1. Face YOUR Reality

According to CNN Money, the average American family made around $59,000 in 2017. While that is the average, it is also true that many Americans make much less than this.

With a lower income, it is even more critical that you have no debt at all. After all, you are already stretching every dollar to cover your bills. You don’t need additional payments causing more financial stress.

Unless you win the lottery, a wealthy relative leaves you a small fortune, or you find a better job, you know your income won’t change.  That is the truth. You can’t change that.

However, what you can and must do is take the steps you can to work yourself out from under the mountain of debt you may be facing. You need to first create a budget, determine how much debt you have and then the steps to pay it off, no matter how much money you make.

 

2. Fully Commit

If you are not 100% ready to make changes, then you are destined for failure. It may be blunt, but it is true. If you can’t “go all in” and fully commit to making whatever difficult changes necessary (trust me, it will be challenging), then you need to stop reading right now.

If you are ready to make this lifestyle change, then read on. You’ve already made huge strides to make changes in your life.

 

3. Create (and use) a Budget and Debt Snowball Form

Knowing where your money goes is paramount to getting out of debt, no matter how much you make. Without your budget, you can’t even consider getting out of debt.

If you have never created a budget, it can be overwhelming.  But, it will also be eye-opening.  In addition to your budget, you should create a debt snowball, start using the envelope system and take better control of your money.  By doing this, you will get a better picture of your debts and how you can tackle them.

Look at paying off debt like a football team.  Each part of your finances is involved in the game:

Home Team – This is you and your family
Visiting Team – These are your debts and expenses
Your End Zone – This is where you will be debt free
PlayBook – Budget and debt snowball forms
Football – Your money
Refs and Penalties – Unexpected instances which set you back in reaching your goals

You would never expect a team to run onto the field and play the game without having the proper plays in mind. The same is true for you;  If every one of the members of your family has a different idea as to how to get your money down the field to pay off your debts, you will never make it there.

Instead, you design smart plays and work together to get there.  You work to get your money past all of the expenses you need to dodge.  There may be setbacks, and you may have to move back before you can get forward.  However, with hard work, you will get there.  You will get onto the scoreboard – and end up claiming victory!

 

4. Find extra money

Before you jump in to try to pay off your debts, you need to have savings.  The reason is that if an emergency comes up, you need to pay for it – in cash.  You do not want to run to your credit card to cover the expense.  It is best to have at least $1,000 in the bank before you get started.

So, before you jump in to pay off those debts, you listed above, make sure you’ve got money in the bank to cover your unforeseen expenses by creating an emergency fund.

Once you have that done, then you are going to have to find a way to squeeze everything you can out of every cent.  For some, it may mean no longer dining out.  For others, it could be shutting off cable television.  Where there is a will, there will always be a way to make this happen.  You just have to do what you can!

I share this true story in our budget post, but I’m putting it here again for you!  My husband and I gave up dining out. No joke. We ate dinner out very infrequently.

While I look back and think it might have been once every couple of weeks, I asked my husband recently, and he said that we were lucky to eat out once a month! It was painful, but now that we’ve cut down out all of our debts, we have income freed up so we can have dinner out more frequently (if we so desire).

For even more inspiration and ideas, you may have to find some radical ways you can get cash to help you get out of debt.  Do whatever it takes (legally and within reason, of course), to help you get out of debt.

Read More:  60 Creative Ways to Save or Make Money

 

5. Find ways to get more money (i.e. side hustle and selling items)

To be honest, if you are struggling to make ends meet on a low income, you won’t be able to just cut enough out of your budget to pay off your debt.  Like my mom use to say – “You can’t get blood out of a turnip” – which means if it isn’t there-there is nothing you can do about it.

That is the truth, and I’m not trying to lie to you. I am realistic and know that if you are making barely enough to cover your expenses, you won’t have any extra money for your debt.  I get that.

You can’t save enough money on your budget to eliminate your debt.  Well, I guess you could, but that is going to take a very, very, VERY long time.  So, what do you do when you’ve saved all you can and still can’t pay off your debts?  Well, you just have to get creative.

For some this may mean finding items you no longer need, which you can sell to raise money.  When we did this step, we had the same issue.  We could not cut anything more from our budget.

For us, this meant selling items we no longer needed. We did a large cleanout and got rid of furniture and other things we were holding onto, just in case we needed them. By doing this, we were able to come up with several thousand dollars — 100% of which went immediately towards our debt.

If that isn’t an option, you might want to consider getting a second job or side business to bring in income to indeed help you get out of debt.  We also did this. I started my website.  Now, let me be Frank in saying that this is not a great way to make money.  Most blogs make little to nothing in the first couple of years.  I was lucky, and we did pretty well, and I was able to bring a bit more each year – all of which helped us to pay off our debts.

It may not be a blog, but perhaps babysitting, or cleaning houses, raking leaves, shoveling snow — there are all sorts of ways that you can make money.

Read More:  Unique Ways to Make Money From Home

It is not the income that is holding most people back, it is the understanding and knowing even where to start.  You might have to scale back on various spending aspects of your life, but when you get to scream from the rooftops — WE’RE DEBT FREE!!!! — it will be worth it all.  I promise you!!!

 

get out of debt

The post How to Get Out Of Debt Fast When You Don’t Have Much Money appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

5 Mortgage Misconceptions Set Straight

Getting a mortgage can be a breeze or a slog, depending on what you know about the process. To get organized and set your expectations properly, let’s debunk some common mortgage myths.

1. Lenders use your best credit scores

If you’re applying for a mortgage jointly with a co-borrower, logic suggests that your lender would use the highest credit score between both of you.

However, lenders take the middle of three credit scores (from Equifax, TransUnion and Experian) for each borrower, and then use the lowest score between both borrowers’ “middle scores.”

So, if you had a middle score of 780, and your co-borrower had a middle score of 660, most lenders would qualify and approve you using the 660 credit score.

Rates are tied to credit scores, so in this example, your rate would be based on the 660 credit score, which would push your rate up significantly - or potentially even make you ineligible for the loan.

There are exceptions to this lowest-case-credit-score rule. Most notably, if you have the higher credit score and are also the higher earner, some lenders will allow your higher credit score on the file – but this is mostly for jumbo loans above $417,000.

Ask your lender about exceptions if you have credit score disparity between co-borrowers, but know that these exceptions are rare.

2. The rate you’re quoted is the rate you’ll get

Unless you’re locking in a rate at the moment it’s quoted, that rate quote can change. Rates are tied to daily trading of mortgage bonds, so most lenders’ rates change throughout each day.

Refinancers can often lock a rate when it’s quoted – as long as you’ve given your lender enough information and documentation to determine if you qualify for the quoted rate.

You typically receive a quote when you’re beginning your pre-approval process, but a rate lock runs with a borrower and a property. So until you’ve found a home to buy, you can’t lock your rate. And while you’re home shopping, rates will be changing daily, so you’ll need updated quotes from your lender throughout your home shopping process.

Rate quotes also come with an annual percentage rate (APR), which is a federally required disclosure that shows what your rate would be if all loan fees are incorporated into the rate.

This can make you think that APR is the rate you’ll get, but your loan payment will always be based on your locked rate, and the APR is just a disclosure to help you understand fees.

3. Fixed-rate mortgages are always better than adjustable-rate mortgages

After the 2008 financial crisis, many borrowers started preferring 30-year fixed loans. For good reason too: The rate and payment on a 30-year fixed loan can never change. But the longer the rate is fixed for, the higher the rate.

So before settling on a 30-year fixed, ask yourself this question: How long am I going to own this home (or keep the loan) for?

Suppose the answer is five years. If you got a five-year adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) instead of a 30-year fixed, your rate would be about .875 percent lower. On a $200,000 loan, you’d save $146 per month in interest by taking the five-year ARM. On a $600,000 loan, the monthly interest cost savings is $438.

To optimize your home financing, peg the loan term as closely as you can to your expected time horizon in the home.

4. Real estate agents don’t care which lender you use

A federal law enacted in 1974 called the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) prohibits lenders and real estate agents from paying each other fees to refer customers to each other. So as a mortgage shopper, you’re always free to use any lender you choose.

But real estate agents who would represent you as a buyer do care which lender you use. They’ll often suggest that you use a local lender who’s experienced with your area’s nuances, such as local taxation rules, settlement procedures and appraisal methodologies.

These areas are all part of the loan process and can delay or kill deals if a nonlocal lender isn’t experienced enough to handle them.

Likewise, real estate agents representing sellers on homes you’re interested in will often prioritize purchase offers based on the quality of loan approvals. Local lenders who are known and respected by listing agents give your purchase offers more credibility.

5. Mortgage insurance is always required if you put less than 20 percent down

Mortgage insurance is a lender-risk premium placed on many home loans when you’re putting less than 20 percent down. In short, it means your total monthly housing cost is higher. But you can buy a home with less than 20 percent down and avoid mortgage insurance.

The most common way to do this is with a combination first and second mortgage – often called a piggyback – where the first mortgage is capped at 80 percent of the home’s value, and the second mortgage is for the balance of what you want to finance.

Related:

Originally published January 12, 2016.

Source: zillow.com

Should I Refinance My Student Loans?

Should I refinance my student loans? It depends on your situation. But a common reason for people to refinance their student loans is that they want to pay less interest. Even a small decrease in the rate could save you a lot of money over the life of the loan and ultimately help you pay off your student loans faster.

Another reason could be that you want to change the loan type (i.e., switching from a fixed rate to a variable rate or vice versa).

Whatever your reasons for wanting to refinance your student loans may be, you should always compare your student loan rate with other rates on the market. Some lenders always update their rates to make sure they are competitive on the market. So the chance is high that you could get a better deal with another lender.

The best way to compare student loan rates is through LendKey. LendKey’s rate starts as low as at 1.9%. And they have 5, 7, 10, 15 & 20 year loan terms. The great thing about LendKey is that checking your rates will NOT affect your credit score.

CHECK YOUR RATE

What does refinancing your student loans mean?

In simple terms, when you refinance your student loans, you’re essentially taking out a brand new loan in order to pay off your existing student loan. This can get you a better deal and save you money in the long term. The trick is to figure out if it makes sense to refinance.

Should I refinance my student loans? Does it make sense to do so?

When it makes sense to refinance your student loans:

  • Lower interest rates are available.
  • You have other large debts, such as credit card debts and personal loans, and you want to consolidate all of your loans.
  • A major change in your life has happened recently.
  • You want to switch to a fixed rate.

When it doesn’t make sense to refinance your student loans

  • Your credit score is low and you are less likely to get a good rate.
  • You’re no longer have a stable job, and your income is not reliable.
  • Your current loan is at a fixed rate.

To decide whether you should refinance your student loans, you should have a reason why you want to refinance. Is it because you want to pay a lower interest rate? Do you want to consolidate all of your loans?

Wanting a lower interest rate on your student loans should not be your only consideration when wanting to refinance. The life of the loan should also be considered, and not just the interest rate. That means, will it be variable interest rate or fixed interest rate. This is important as it can impact your long term financial obligations.

You should also consider the cost of switching to another lender. There are fees, such as application fees and ongoing charges associated with switching to another lender.

Is now the right time to refinance your student loans?

A better interest rate is not the only factor to consider when thinking of refinancing your student loans.

The stability of your job should also be considered. How stable is your job? Can you manage to make monthly payments on your income? If you’ve recently gone part-time, or gone freelancing, now is probably not a good time to refinance your student loans.

Likewise, if you have just switched to a more stable, full time job, you may need to wait for like 6 months or even a year before a bank can consider your loan application.

This is where a financial advisor can be handy, as they can help you make the right financial decision.

It’s also a good idea to talk to existing student loans provider when considering refinancing. Some lenders, in order to keep your business, might try to lower your interest rates or waive some fees for you. They’d be very willing to do that especially if you always make your payments on time and have been with them for a long time.

If you decide to go with another lender, make sure your financial situation is in shape. That means that you don’t have that much outstanding debts such as credit card debts, and that you have always paid your bills on time. This is important not only to get qualified, but also to get a better rate.

When refinancing your student loans make sense

There can be several reasons to refinance your student loans. Perhaps you have a better job, making more money. Or perhaps your current student loan rate is not competitive anymore.

Even if you don’t have any specific reason, it’s always a good idea to know what’s available to you. There might be great deals out there.

Every once in a while, you might want to reassess your student loan rate and compare it to other student loan rate on the market.

One easy way to reassess your options is with LendKey. LendKey is an online platform that allows you to browse multiple low-interest loans from almost 300 community banks and credit unions, instead of big banks.

LendKey allows for more flexibility and lower interest rates. It can help you find the right student loan for you without visiting dozen bank branches.

Plus applying to a dozen of student loans will not HURT your credit score. LendKey does a soft check on you, so you can compare student loans from multiple lenders before you actually apply for one.

Click here to check your rates through LendKey.

Indeed, a lower interest rate and lower repayments are some of the more common reasons to refinance your student loans. Even a slight decrease on your interest rate might make a big difference on your monthly student loan payments.

Indeed any student loan refinance calculator out there can tell you how much you can save.

Another common reason to refinance your student loans might be to consolidate all of your debts and have one monthly repayment. Debt consolidation is when you combine all of your debts so you have one big repayment, instead of several.

If you have other debts such as personal loans, car loan, credit card debts, home loan, then it makes sense to roll these debts together with your student loan. The advantage is that your student loan rate is typically lower.

When refinancing your student loans doesn’t make sense.

There are times when refinancing doesn’t make sense.

For example, if you have built a good relationship with your lender, it might not be a good idea to switch to another lender simply to get a lower interest rate. The new lender might raise your rate once you switch, but you’ve just ruined your good relationship with your old lender.

Another reason you should not refinance your student loans is if you you have been paying for a long time already. Refinancing to a longer term might reduce your monthly payments, but will cost you many more years and more money. So if your current balance is already low, it’s not very beneficial to refinance.

You should also not refinance your student loans if your interest rate on your current student loan is low. There is no real benefit to be had from refinancing an already low interest rate. In fact, you may end up incurring more costs and fees when switching.

Your credit score is low

Refinancing your student loans may not be a good idea if your credit score is low.

While you can apply with a co-signer if you have a low credit score, but it can be hard to find someone to co-sign for you.

So, at a minimum, make sure your credit score is at least 650. If it’s not where is supposed to be, take steps to raise your credit score.

Don’t know your credit score, get a free credit score with Credit Sesame.

Bottom line

If you’re asking yourself: “should I refinance my student loans?” The answer is: it depends on your unique situation. But there are great benefits to refinancing your student loans. To reiterate, it can save you thousands of dollars over the life of the loan; it can reduce your loan payments significantly. However, before deciding to take the plunge you have to make sure you’re getting a better deal.

After you have checked your rates, you should definitely refinance your student loans. Not only will you get a reduced interest rate, you will also get a lower monthly payment and pay less over the life of your loan.

Plus when you’re approved for a loan you applied through Lendkey, you’ll get a $100 bonus after the loan is disbursed.

Read More:

  • 5 Tips To Pay Off Your Student Loans Faster
  • How Much Should You Save A Month?
  • Buying A Home For The First Time? Avoid These Mistakes

Work with the Right Financial Advisor

You can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals (whether it is making more money, paying off debt, investing, buying a house, planning for retirement, saving, etc). So, find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goals, get started now.

The post Should I Refinance My Student Loans? appeared first on GrowthRapidly.

Source: growthrapidly.com

Personal Finance Facts and Statistics

It’s often said that “numbers don’t lie”. If so, what does that reveal about personal finance in the USA? To answer that question, we’ve prepared this analysis of personal finance facts and statistics to help you understand approximately where you are in comparison with other Americans.

The information revealed in our analysis isn’t intended to make you feel insecure in any way. Instead, it’s designed to help set parameters that will enable you to see how you are doing and to make improvements where you believe it’s necessary.

We hope you like numbers because we have plenty of them! They’re a necessary evil, and they go with the territory when it comes to personal finance. We’re going to present statistics concerning multiple topics relating to income, debt, savings and budgeting, and financial planning.

Income

Median Household Income Per State

The median household income nationwide is $79,900. But there is a wide variation between the individual states. The following median household income statistics are provided by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, as of April 1, 2021:

State Median Household Income
Alabama $66,700
Alaska $93,900
Arizona $73,200
Arkansas $60,700
California $90,100
Colorado $93,000
Connecticut $102,600
Delaware $83,000
District of Columbia $123,100
Florida $70,000
Georgia $74,700
Hawaii $99,800
Idaho $69,000
Illinois $85,000
Indiana $73,300
Iowa $79,500
Kansas $77,400
Kentucky $65,100
Louisiana $64,700
Maine $75,700
Maryland $106,000
Massachusetts $106,200
Michigan $75,300
Minnesota $93,100
Mississippi $60,000
Missouri $72,300
Montana $72,100
Nebraska $79,400
Nevada $75,100
New Hampshire $98,200
New Jersey $106,000
New Mexico $61,400
New York $87,100
North Carolina $70,900
North Dakota $90,100
Ohio $75,300
Oklahoma $67,000
Oregon $81,200
Pennsylvania $81,000
Rhode Island $88,000
South Carolina $68,700
South Dakota $75,500
Tennessee $68,600
Texas $75,100
Utah $85,300
Vermont $84,100
Virginia $93,000
Washington $91,600
West Virginia $60,300
Wisconsin $80,300
Wyoming $81,900
US $79,900

What Percent of People Represent the Highest Incomes in USA

Have you ever wondered where your income falls among wage earners nationwide? For example, you may be interested to know that if your household income is over $200,000 per year, you’re among the 10.3% wealthiest households in the country.

According to Statista, the income distribution in the US is as follows (for 2019):

How many Americans Live Below the Poverty Line?

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 10.5% of the population – or about 34 million people – were below the poverty line in 2019.

According to the US Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) the poverty line for 2019 is as follows (based on annual income by household size) for most of the country:

  • One person – $12,490
  • Two people – $16,910
  • Three people – $21,330
  • Four people – $25,750
  • Five people – $30,170
  • Six people – $34,590
  • Seven people – $39,010
  • Eight people – $43,430

Top 5 Richest States in the USA

Based on the table for “Median Household Income Per State” provided by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development in the first section above, the top five richest states in the USA are:

  • Massachusetts, $106,200
  • Maryland, $106,000
  • New Jersey, $106,000
  • Connecticut, $102,600
  • Hawaii, $99,800

Top 5 Poorest States in the USA

Based on the table for “Median Household Income Per State” provided by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development in the first section above, the top five poorest states in the USA are:

  • Mississippi, $60,000
  • West Virginia, $60,300
  • Arkansas, $60,700
  • New Mexico, $61,400
  • Louisiana, $64,700

Income Per Education Level

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), income per education level is as follows (for 2017):

Education Level Mean usual weekly earnings Annual earnings
Doctoral degree $1,743 $90,636
Professional degree $1,836 $95,472
Master’s degree $1,401 $72,852
Bachelor’s degree $1,173 $60,996
Associate’s degree $836 $43,472
Some college, no degree $774 $40,248
High school diploma, no college $712 $37,024
Less than a high school diploma $520 $27,040
Average for all education levels $907 $47,164

Median Earnings by Age Bracket

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, median earnings by age bracket are as follows (for the second quarter of 2021):

Age Bracket Mean usual weekly earnings Annual earnings
16 to 24 $619 $32,188
25 to 34 $928 $48,256
35 to 44 $1,119 $58,188
45 to 54 $1,134 $58,968
55 to 64 $1,130 $58,760
65 and over $989 $51,428

Debt

Average Annual Consumer Spending in the USA

Average annual consumer spending in the USA was $63,036 in 2019, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The biggest individual category expenses were:

  • Housing, $20,679
  • Transportation, $10,742
  • Food, $8,169
  • Personal insurance and pensions, $7,165
  • Health, $5,193

Total Consumer Debt in the USA

Total consumer debt in the USA is $14.96 trillion. Those are the statistics issued by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York for the second quarter of 2021. That includes all forms of consumer debt, including home mortgages, student loans, credit cards, and auto loans.

Amount of Credit Card Debt in the USA

The amount of credit card debt in the USA is $807 billion. Average credit card debt per family is $6,270, and 45.4% of families carry some amount of credit card debt. (Source: Value Penguin)

How Many Americans Know How Much They are Paying in Credit Card Interest?

The average American household pays $1,045.55 in credit card interest each year. It’s entirely likely the average American has no solid idea how much he or she is paying, due to multiple credit cards, and the variable nature of both credit card balances and interest rates.

How Many Car Repossessions Happen Yearly in the USA

About 2 million car repossessions yearly in the USA (source: Etags.com). Vehicles are typically repossessed within 90 days of loan default (your last payment).

Total Amount of Student Loan Debt in the USA

The total amount of student loan debt in the USA is a record $1.71 trillion as of the beginning of 2021 (source: StudentLoanHero.com).

44.7 million students and graduates owe an average of nearly $30,000 in student loan debt. But student loan debts taken by parents for the benefit of their children averaged $37,200 per borrower.

How Many Americans File for Bankruptcy Each Year?

544,463 Americans file for bankruptcy each year, including 522,808 personal bankruptcies. The rest are business bankruptcies. (Source: US Courts.gov.)

Of the total, 378,953 were Chapter 7 bankruptcies, representing total and immediate bankruptcy. 156,377 were Chapter 13 bankruptcies, representing partial bankruptcies, largely settled through installment payments.

Savings and Budgeting

The Average Number of People with No Savings

45% of Americans have no savings at all (source: GOBankingRates).

How Many Americans Live Paycheck-to-Paycheck?

The information is a bit dated, but according to a survey conducted by CareerBuilder in 2017, 78% of Americans live paycheck-to-paycheck. This includes fully 10% of households with annual incomes of $100,000 or more.

How Many Americans Have a Budget?

Only 41% of Americans have a budget, according to LendEdu.com.

How Many Americans Have Enough in Their Savings to Cover a $1,000 Emergency?

Only 39% of Americans have enough money in their savings to cover a $1,000 emergency, according to a survey taken by Bankrate and released at the beginning of 2021. Most of the rest reported they would get the funds from credit cards, personal loans, or borrowing from family and friends.

Amount Paid by Americans in Overdraft Fees Yearly

Americans paid $11.8 billion in overdraft fees in 2020. Most of these fees were paid by individuals considered to be financially vulnerable. (Source: Forbes.)

Average Amount of Savings per American

The average amount of savings per American is $17,135, as of November 2020. That’s the national average, however state averages vary considerably. The average in West Virginia is $6,936 (the lowest), while the average in South Dakota is $24,497 (the highest).

Amount of Americans with Retirement Savings

50.5% of Americans have retirement savings, with an average balance of $65,000. This is according to information released by the Federal Reserve for 2019.

How Much Should You Have Saved for Retirement by Age Bracket?

How much you should have saved for retirement by age bracket is largely subjective. It’s based on your current income – assuming it’s sufficient to cover your living expenses – multiplied by a factor that’s likely to provide a sufficient amount of retirement savings by the time you reach age 65.

For example, by the time you’re 40, you should have between 1.5 and 2.5 times your current annual salary saved for retirement. But the amount you should have saved will increase with each age bracket.

The following table, provided by the investment firm T.Rowe Price provides solid guidance as to how much you should have saved for retirement at eight age brackets, ranging from 30 to 65:

The post Personal Finance Facts and Statistics appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com